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Southern Cooking with Jeanne Weimer
Southern Cooking with Jeanne Weimer

Black walnut trees down south are absolutely everywhere. We had a huge one in our backyard.  Every summer when we cut the grass, them dad-burn things would get under the lawnmower and come back and bite you…. We used to hate them things… but I have to tell ya.. they make an amazing pound cake.

Cracking them and getting them out of their shell was a process in itself. We would gather them in a five gallon bucket, lay newspapers on the driveway, and lay the walnuts on them.  More papers were place on top of the walnuts before backing over them with the car to crack the hard outer shell.  I loved doing this..cause I got to drive and I was around 10.  After the cracking, we pulled out the nutmeat. Boy they would stink too.. smelled like a skunk in heat!! Granny would take them in right away and get her pound cake going. 

Black Walnut Poundcake

1 cup butter
1/3 cup shortening
3 cups sugar
5 eggs
3 cups plain flour + 1 tbsp
½ tsp baking powder
1 cup milk
½ tsp vanilla
1 cup black walnuts

DO NOT PREHEAT your oven. Beat butter and shortening until smooth, then add sugar. Beat at medium speed for a couple of minutes. Add your eggs one at a time, beating after each one. In a small bowl combine all of your dry ingredients(do not add the tbsp of flour here) and slowly add them to your butter and sugar mix alternating with the milk until just blended. Now take your tbsp. of flour and add it to your walnuts and mix. Toss these into your batter with your vanilla. Pour into a greased and floured 10 inch tube pan and bake at 325 degrees for at least 1 ¼ hours or until broom straw, when inserted, into the middle comes out clean.

HAPPY EATIN!!!!


Coleslaw Down South by Jeanne Weimer

Coleslaw down south is considered a vegetable and we eat it on just about everything!  Hot dogs and hamburgers especially.  Coleslaw Samich with mustard will make ya want ta curl up and sing Dixie!! This is an old southern recipe that has been handed down for many a year.  Enjoy and remember a little bit of this and a little bit of that never hurt nothing!!!

1 small head cabbage grated

1 tomato chopped 

2 cups regular mayonnaise (not hellmans!)

2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar

½  cup sugar

1 tsp onion powder

Salt and pepper to taste

Mix all ingredients and make sure you have enough mayo.  If it’s a little dry add more and adjust other ingredients to taste. 

Happy cookouts and remember to try this on your samiches. I think you will be surprised!!


Green Maters by Jeanne Weimer


So many people have requested this recipe, I reckon I had better get it in here. When we were small we would pull the green maters off the vines and play war with them.. got our hides tanned for that one many times. Green maters came about down south because you are constantly reminded “Waste not, want not.”   Instead of us young’uns ruining them they thought of something better to do with them, and in the south the only way to cook is to fry it up!!! 


Fried green tomatoes

6 to 8 large green tomatoes

2 cups plain flour

1 cup cornmeal

Milk

Pinch of salt and pepper

Garlic powder

½ cup vegetable oil

Slice your maters about ¼ in. thick, leaving the skin on. Now you are going to fix what we call a dredge. Combine flour and milk to form a thin batter. Add salt, pepper and garlic powder. Now take each slice of mater and put it in the dredge. Take it out and shake it off. Then drop it in the cornmeal. Immediately put in your frying pan with your grease already heated. Cook until they are brown. 

HAPPY EATIN!!!!



Granny's Fried Apple Pies with Jeanne Weimer

Summer months remind me of all the canning and drying my Granny and I used to do… One of the things I remember most is drying apples.  We lived in a 2 story house with a large back porch attached. The back porch had a tin roof that was right under our bedroom window. Oh how we loved to hear the rain on that ole tin. Anyway, Granny would peal and core a bushel of apples. Then our work began.  She would take old newpapers and hand them to me out of the bedroom window to the tin roof. I would spread them out and lay the apple slices on them to dry (back then a dehydrator was for fancy folk). They would lay on that ole tin roof til night. Then we hauled them in for the night and put them back out the next day. We would do this for a week… now you know why I bought a dehydrator. This recipe is what we used the apples for and believe me… this was the absolute best.

Granny’s Fried Apple Pies

3 cups dried apples

1 cup sugar (depending on taste more or less)

2 cups water

Dump everything into a pot. Cook the apples until they are mush. Taste them to make sure you have them as sweet as you want them. If not, add more sugar and cook a little more.

3 cups Plain flour

1 tsp baking soda

1 stick butter

Milk

Pinch of salt

Iron skillet with approximately ½ in. of hot grease (you can use cooking oil)

Mix first three ingredients crumbling the COLD butter into the flour with your hands until the flour forms peas. Then add enough milk to form a soft dough. Add salt. Now don’t mix this too long or your pies will be tough. Pat enough dough out to form a small round circle about ¼ inch thick and the size of a salad plate. You can leave them a little thicker but be careful not to make they too thick or they won’t cook all the way. Drop a dollop of apples in the center. Fold your dough over to form a half moon. With a fork, go around the outside edge of the pie and press the edges together.  Lay in hot grease in the skillet to brown.  Cook on medium to low heat. Take these out and drain on paper towels…. I can’t fix these fast enough for my crew. They grab them as fast as they come out.


Homemade Pinto Beans with Jeanne Weimer

Years ago when my boys were little ones, I was a single mom who worked many jobs but always had to feed the young ones.  One of the easiest and best suppers we had was a big pot of beans with cornbread and fried potatoes.  Now days so many of our young people have no clue how to cook dried beans so I thought we might just look at that today.  Not only are they easy but also very healthy.  No preservatives!!

Homemade Pinto Beans

1 Bag of Dried Pintos

1 Tsp Onion Powder

1 Ham bone or pieces of ham bone or pieces of ham (Can also use 2 slices of uncooked bacon instead of the ham)

This recipe starts the previous night because you need to wash and soak your beans.  Place them in a large bowl after washing them in a colander.  Put enough water in the colander to completely cover the beans, filling the bowl.  Cover it with a plate and let it sit overnight. 
The next mornings, rinse the beans one more time, dump into a crock-pot, and add the onion powder, meat, salt, and pepper to taste.  Add enough water to bring it to the top of your pot and place on high.  At suppertime, chop some taters; throw them in a skillet, frying until crispy.

Happy eatin!


Low Country Boil or Frogmore Stew by Jeanne Weimer


Summertime in the South means lots of cookouts with family and friends.  If you have a whole passel of friends like most of us, you need lots of vittles for them kinfolk.  One of the easiest and best recipes for that is Low Country Boil or Frogmore Stew. 

You gonna need a very large kettle, about 8 quarts or bigger. Build you a nice bonfire to cook it over or boil it on the stove.  Either way this is just fun!!!! 

6 quarts water
¾ cup Old Bay seasoning (found in the seasoning aisle) 
2 pounds of red taters 
2 pounds smoked sausage cut up into chunks 
12 half ears of shucked corn 
4 pounds of unpeeled shrimp or bout the same amount of Crab legs 
½ stick of butter per person 

Boil your water and seasoning in your kettle for about 15 minutes to dissolve.  Add your taters whole and washed.  Let them boil for 15 to 20 minutes depending on the size of tater.  Then just dump everything else in except the shrimp.  When your taters are done add the shrimp or Crab legs.  Boil them until they turn pink, about 10 minutes.

Now comes the fun part, get you some newspaper and spread it out on the tables outside.  Strain your pot of goodies.  Dump it straight onto the newspaper.

Make sure everyone has a bowl of melted butter to dip it in…enjoy your eats!!!  No utensils needed!  All finger food.  After all, us southerners eat with our fingers and don’t wear shoes!


Southern Homemade Steak and Gravy by Jeanne Weimer

When I was just a little thing, my granddaddy would stand me on a coke box to help serve cafeteria style in our family restaurant.  I remember stirring those beans and sneaking a bite many a time, but the thing I remember most was my granny's steak and gravy.  One thing you have to know about southerners, we have to have gravy on it or fry it and their ain't no other way to fix really good eats.  I have found that a lot of these younger folks have no clue how to make good gravy.  I thought I might try to help.  

Here is my granny's recipe for homemade steak and gravy.
 Ingredients:

4-5 pieces round steak (tenderized)
1-2 cups plain flour
¼ cup cooking oil (back then we just used touselard)
2-3 cups water
Salt and pepper to taste
 Flour the steak and put it in a hot skillet with the oil.  Make sure your oil is hot now, cause if it ain't, it just won't work.  

Brown the steak on both sides, and then move it to the side of the pan.

Put approximately 3 tablespoons of flour (rounded) into the hot oil.  The secret (shh) to good gravy is to brown the flour till it turns into what we call rue.  As it starts to turn brown, hurry up and pour your water into the rue.  Stir it till it thickens.  Add more water if you need to but after it's just right, turn down the burner and let the steak simmer in the gravy for at least an hour.

Whip you up some rice and green beans and you are set.  Uuhhmmmuhmmmm!  Can't beat this stuff!!  Ya all come back now ya hear!


Southern Corn Fritters by Jeanne Weimer


One of the most wonderful things about a southern summer is all of the fresh vegetables literally everywhere.  There are farmers markets galore filled with peas in a pod and cheap corn, particularly silver queen, my favorite. Mixed corn is fed to the cows.  This recipe is one my granny used to make every summer and man-o-man it makes you want to dance a jig. 

Southern Corn Fritters

8 to 12 ears of sweet corn still on the cob

1 tbsp sugar( or more is the corn isn’t real sweet)

1 c. plain flour

1tsp salt

1 tsp.onion powder

Smidge of salt and pepper.

½ cup vegetable oil

Start by cutting the corn off of the cob and scraping it to release the milk into a large bowl. Once this is done, mix all ingredients together except oil,with a spoon. If it's too thin, add more flour.  If it' too thick, add more milk. Drop by dollops (about a tbsp.) into a skillet that you have heated your grease in.  Kinda flatten them out so they look like a small pancake. Cook until brown on both sides and serve up with sliced tomatoes and fried fatback…. Yummmyy

As always HAPPY EATIN!!


Southern Homemade Steak and Gravy by Jeanne Weimer

When I was just a little thing, my granddaddy would stand me on a coke box to help serve cafeteria style in our family restaurant.  I remember stirring those beans and sneaking a bite many a time, but the thing I remember most was my granny's steak and gravy.  One thing you have to know about southerners, we have to have gravy on it or fry it and their ain't no other way to fix really good eats.  I have found that a lot of these younger folks have no clue how to make good gravy.  I thought I might try to help.  

Here is my granny's recipe for homemade steak and gravy.
 Ingredients:

4-5 pieces round steak (tenderized)
1-2 cups plain flour
¼ cup cooking oil (back then we just used touselard)
2-3 cups water
Salt and pepper to taste
 Flour the steak and put it in a hot skillet with the oil.  Make sure your oil is hot now, cause if it ain't, it just won't work.  

Brown the steak on both sides, and then move it to the side of the pan.

Put approximately 3 tablespoons of flour (rounded) into the hot oil.  The secret (shh) to good gravy is to brown the flour till it turns into what we call rue.  As it starts to turn brown, hurry up and pour your water into the rue.  Stir it till it thickens.  Add more water if you need to but after it's just right, turn down the burner and let the steak simmer in the gravy for at least an hour.

Whip you up some rice and green beans and you are set.  Uuhhmmmuhmmmm!  Can't beat this stuff!!  Ya all come back now ya hear!


Salad Dressing Recipe by Jeanne Weimer

Cookin in a hot kitchen is something we aim to get out of in the summertime and this good ole salad dressing recipe will help make that possible especially if you have a hankerin for Eyetalian.  Its quick and easy. 

GRILLED CHICKEN BREAST

1 deboned breast per person

1 bottle zesty Italian dressing

Soak chicken in dressing at least 2 hours. DO NOT KEEP AND REUSE THE LEFTOVER DRESSING - just throw it out!!  I use a grill but you can bake these if you want til done. 

SALAD FIXINS

1 head of lettuce mixed with spinach or any other greens that whet your palate.

A mater sliced or diced

1 beautiful cucumber or 2 if you like 

Sliced onion

Grilled chicken breast (1 per person)

SALAD DRESSING

1 bottle zesty Italian dressing

1 cup real mayonnaise (not that sweet stuff - no miracle whip)

½ cup parmesan cheese grated 

2 tsp. onion powder

1/2 cup sugar

Now all you do is pour everything into a blender and let it do its thang for about 5 minutes.  This makes a lot so store it in the fridge. Pour on your salad in a large bowl and mix it all up. 

Throw your chicken breast on top and enjoy!!!

HAPPY EATIN!!


Wild Rice Chicken Salad by Jeanne Weimer

 

One of the most wonderful things I discovered when I moved to Minnesota was the wild rice. Just love it. So I had to experiment with different ways to use it. This is one recipe that isn't a new one but has a little bit of a twist. But my-oh-my, is it good. 

Wild Rice Chicken Salad

2 cups cooked and diced chicken breast

3 stalks celery chopped

1 small onion chopped

2 cups cooked wild rice

1 cup drained CRUSHED pineapple

1 cup washed and halved grapes

2 cups mayonnaise (the real stuff not Helmans)

2 Tbsp apple cider vinegar

½ cups sugar

Combine everything in a large bowl and let chill overnight.. love love love this salad and as usual HAPPY EATIN!!!!


Yellow Squash Casserole by Jeanne Weimer

 

Fresh vegetables are always in good supply down south, however in Minnesota its really hard to find good fresh small yellow crook neck squash. There are a few markets that carry it and if you find it, this is one recipe you will love with it. 

YELLOW SQUASH CASSEROLE

5 to 6 small squashes sliced 

1 cup milk

½ cup water

1 large onion sliced

Put all of the above ingredients into a pot and bowl until the squash is tender. Drain. Now for the second part. 

3 eggs beaten

½ cup milk

8 American cheese slices

½ stick butter

2 cups crushed cheezits

In a 8"x8" pan layer squash mixture, a couple of butter pats and 4 cheese slices
Pour the milk into the beaten eggs, then dump half of it over the cheese slices. Now add your remaining squash, butter and cheese. Then pour the remaining milk and egg mixture over it. Bake in a 325 degree oven for 35 minutes. Pull out and spread the crushed cheezits on top. Bake for 15 minutes or until the cheezits are browned. Yum yum…

HAPPY EATIN!!!